Ayuda Después del Huracán María

By Nayeli on September 22, 2017

Zello te puede ayudar a comunicarte con tus familiares y amigos o encontrar información acerca de la situación en diferentes zonas en Puerto Rico por medio de varios canales disponibles en la aplicación. Recuerda que Zello necesita una red de Internet para funcionar y muchas de las torres en Puerto Rico fueron dañadas durante el huracán. Los canales más activos relacionados con Puerto Rico son:

Si no tienes Zello instalado:

  1. Descarga Zello por medio del Appstore o Play Store y haz clic en “no tengo una cuenta de Zello” o “nueva cuenta de Zello” y sigue los pasos para crear tu cuenta.
  2. Agrega uno de los canales recomendados para tratar de aprender más sobre la situación en Puerto Rico.
  3. Lee los consejos que Zello ofrece para ocasiones de desastre aquí.

La recomendación para saber más de amigos y familiares en Puerto Rico, fuera de Zello son:

  • Contactar a la Administración de Asuntos Federales de Puerto Rico al número 202-778-0710.
  • FEMA recomienda llamar a este número 800-621-3362, y para inscribirte para más ayuda llama TTY: 800-462-7585.
  • Las escuelas publicas son ahora refugios. El estadio San Juan Roberto Clemente es el refugio más grande en la capital.
  • La Cruz Roja Americana recomienda llamar al 1-800-733-2767 para buscar a amigos o familiares con condiciones pre-existentes de salid o condiciones de enfermedades mentales.

Si tienes más preguntas de cómo usar Zello por favor déjanos saber en la sección de comentarios.

Russia Blocks Zello

By Nancy on April 13, 2017

This evening, Russia blocked Zello. This action follows a notice we received last week from the Russian regulator Roskomnadzor that Zello is not in compliance with a law that governs information distribution brokers (Article 10.1 of the Federal Law of 27.07.2006 number 149-FZ).

“Information distribution broker” is how the Russian law describes Internet communications services and includes messenger apps, email providers, and social networks. The law requires that all such services store all application messages and user data in Russia. We would be required to provide this data to law enforcement upon their request. We would also provide law enforcement with the means of surveillance on Zello conversations globally and would have to share all Zello encryption keys with FSB, the Russian state security organization.

These are requirements that we are not able to meet or willing to comply with, even if we could.

Zello is popular in Russia, with more than 400,000 active users there. Like Zello users everywhere, Russians use the app to connect with family members and friends and to participate in social, political, and humanitarian conversations and events. But it is also used by search and rescue personnel, taxi services, law enforcement, and drivers needing assistance.

No other global service would be willing to meet this Roskomnadzor law. We cannot speculate why the Russian government is blocking their citizens’ communication through Zello.

Besides Zello, the only other major service known to be blocked is LinkedIn, which also refused to comply with the Roskomnadzor and has been blocked in Russia since November 2016.

Zello Channels are a powerful feature of the app which makes it easy to create groups for public or private conversations. Large numbers of Zello users in Ukraine, Hong Kong, Venezuela, Turkey, and Egypt have relied on Zello to organize democratic political movements in their countries.

Russians who rely on Zello should use VPN solutions to continue using Zello. Zello is working on deploying technology to circumvent the block.

Bill Moore
CEO Zello

Related press coverage from the Roskomnadzor warning last week:
https://globalvoices.org/2017/04/10/russia-blocks-walkie-talkie-app-zello-as-truckers-strike/
https://en.crimerussia.com/gromkie-dela/roskomnadzor-blocked-zello-app-used-by-striking-truckers/

Story about trucker strike with Zello mention
https://therussianreader.com/tag/zello-walkie-talkie-app/

News from Venezuelan block of Zello
News from Ukraine use of Zello

Zello Celebrates 100 Million Users!

By Nancy on February 1, 2017


It took us almost 9 years to do it, but Zello registered users now exceed 100,000,000! We are very proud and excited about this achievement and want to share it with our Zello fans. Without the support generated through word-of-mouth by our users, we could not have attained this major milestone.

A Little Zello Trivia

Zello started out as “Loudtalks” in Russia back in 2007. The original Loudtalks application was designed for Windows PC, and allowed users to communicate instantly with friends by pushing and holding a hot key. You can still get Zello for Windows from our website. After the official launch on September 17, 2007 at the TechCrunch40 Conference in San Francisco, the service retained a low profile with about 10,000 registered users in the first three months. While traction was slow, the team kept improving the product and introducing new features, all while running the service from a single $200/month server hosted in Houston, TX at ThePlanet.

Everything changed with the release of Loudtalks for Blackberry. It was the first voice communications app on that platform, providing free push-to-talk (PTT) using any carrier network or WiFi. The Loudtalks Blackberry app drew over two million users within the first three weeks of its launch. The little side project was now a full-blown startup venture.

In early 2012, the Loudtalks team permanently relocated to Austin, TX where Loudtalks was rebranded and relaunched as Zello that February. Bill Moore (former founder and the CEO of TuneIn Radio) became the CEO of the newly incorporated, U.S. based company. From the original team of three in 2007, Zello has grown to a team of 16 – still small considering the size of Zello’s user base. Only eight developers support over 100 million users worldwide.

Zello adds ZelloWork, Hardware Vendors, and Software Developer Program

In addition to the free consumer app, we have a paid subscription service called ZelloWork. ZelloWork provides PTT solutions for enterprise and mid-size businesses around the world; it is rapidly becoming the go-to solution for businesses trying to update antiquated radio systems. Major companies such as Starwood, Marriott, W Hotels, Restoration Hardware, IKEA, YRC Freight, Hubspot, and Honda use ZelloWork.

Zello has worked with numerous hardware vendors to offer our users a wide selection of hands-free and enhanced audio solutions. See Zello Accessories for the full list of supported accessories. In addition, Zello has recently added an ISV Developer Program. Third party developers can now integrate ZelloWork into their own apps using SDKs and APIs available from the ZelloWork Developer Program.

Our Users are our Priority

Since its launch, Zello has remained totally free, ad-free and spam-free – and we plan to keep it that way. As we expand and improve our products and services, Zello will continue to remain focused on optimizing the user experience, ensuring a high-quality product, and providing top-notch support. We love hearing from our fans who are using Zello for good causes. Whether it’s connecting people with similar goals/ideologies, reducing crime in neighborhoods, or rescuing people during natural disasters, we are proud that Zello has been chosen to be part of these efforts.

If you are using Zello to improve your community, or have any suggestions on how to take Zello to the next milestone of 1 billion users, we’d love to hear from you! You can send suggestions to info@zello.com or support@zello.com.

Thanks for the Zello Love!

The Cajun Navy: How Tech and Boaters Joined Forces to Save Lives

By Nancy on October 10, 2016

cajunnavypic

You might not have heard, but last August 2016, the biggest flood to hit Louisiana in 500 years happened. More than 30,000 people were evacuated and over 146,000 homes damaged. Unlike well-known Hurricane Katrina in 2005, it didn’t have a name, and the rescue and recovery efforts were better orchestrated. So it just wasn’t deemed as newsworthy.

Consequently, little was publicized about the rescue efforts of a small ragtag band of boaters known as the “Cajun Navy.” But their story deserves to be told. It’s a story about regular folks doing extraordinary things, using a little tech and a lot of determination.

The original Cajun Navy was born out of necessity during Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Plagued by government red tape and delayed rescue efforts during Katrina, a small group of locals with boats got together and pitched in to do whatever they could. They became local heroes known as The Cajun Navy, as they picked up residents trapped by flood waters, put them on their boats, and transported them to safety.

The namesake group was called into action again this past August 12th, when flooding began in Livingston Parish – the hardest hit area. The amount of water rose so quickly, that it caught many residents off guard. Unable to prepare and evacuate in time, many found themselves stranded in their homes or on their rooftops.

Initial frantic calls for help came across on Facebook posts. AT&T cell towers were knocked out, making phone calls impossible. Many people in neighboring unaffected parishes saw these pleas and wanted to do something to help. They didn’t want to sit idle or wait for the government to come and rescue these people. It was at this point that a new, stronger, and more organized Cajun Navy really sprang into action.

Realizing there needed to be a central point of command to coordinate rescue efforts, stay-at-home mom and local Good Samaritan, Alaina Hebert, took it upon herself to head rescue efforts. A brand-new Facebook group for rescue efforts was created, asking for volunteers to join, especially those with boats and other equipment. The group eventually grew to over 23,000 members from all parts of the U.S. With a huge base of volunteers ready and able to help out, the Cajun Navy was now ready to take on the daunting task of coordinating water rescues.

As the flooding progressed, Parish Sheriff offices quickly became inundated with calls for help. With a backlog of over over 150 unanswered calls, Parish officials welcomed the offer of help from the Cajun Navy to handle some of the overflow. Cajun Navy volunteers immediately stepped in to help, going where needed with Sheriff Deputies onboard using their flotilla of fishing boats, canoes, and kayaks.

In the end, the Cajun Navy, with their band of 100-200 amateur and professional boaters, managed to save thousands of stranded residents and pets. The entire rescue effort was coordinated using two free apps: Zello as a live walkie-talkie dispatch and Glympse as a GPS locator. It was the first time apps had been used in this way – the technology did not exist during Hurricane Katrina.

Shawn Boudreaux, VP of the Cajun Navy and self-described “closet nerd” introduced the technology to the group. An avid player of Ingress (a location-based mobile app game), he used Zello to communicate with fellow team members during Ingress events. Shawn knew Zello could be a great tool for dispatchers to coordinate the hundreds of boats scattered throughout flooded areas. With the support of now Cajun Navy President, Alaina Hebert, he put the apps in motion by asking for volunteers on Facebook to come and install Zello and Glympse on their devices before going out on water rescues.

Shawn created a private Zello channel called “CajunNavy” for the volunteer dispatchers and boaters to communicate with each other. At the peak of the crisis, the channel had over 800 members or subscribers. All 800 could be online and active at the same time (the limit is 2000). As calls for help came in, they were transmitted live on the channel. By using Glympse and Google Maps for GPS coordinates, the closest boats could then be dispatched to help. The process resulted in more efficient and timely rescues.

A sister group named the “Cajun Army” also used Zello to coordinate post-flood efforts, providing food and shelter and dispatching volunteers to help clean-up damaged homes.

cajunarmypic

Though flood waters have since receded, the Cajun Navy and Cajun Army continues to help their neighbors rebuild their homes and lives. This is all done without monetary donations or government aid. If you would like to help out or just thank them, please join their Facebook groups and Zello channel by using the links below.

Cajun Navy Facebook Page
Cajun Army Facebook Page
Cajun Navy Zello Channel

If you have a similar story of how you used Zello to help your community, please contact us at info@zello.com. We’d love to hear about it!

Goodbye Zello Local

By Bill Moore on September 26, 2014

Zello Local feature first introduced this June never became popular so was pulled to simplify the app.

Many found the feature and a few started local conversations. But even with hundreds of nearby Zello users listening, the conversations seldom lived on.

Zello is anonymous and only used approximate location, yet many users worried about their security. Maybe they worried because our live voice is uniquely authentic. Of course that’s what makes Zello special.

Live public and private voice channels remain popular and we’ll keep trying new ideas to make Zello a better place to keep and make friends.

Zello PTT Walkie-Talkie: Friends and Charity Meet

By Nancy on June 3, 2014

It was almost two years ago when Jonet Rohmanyu stumbled upon the Zello walkie-talkie push-to-talk (PTT) app. Like many things in life, little things can lead to life-changing experiences. And that’s exactly what happened to Jonet.

Jonet started using Zello after hearing about it in his village of Jogja, Indonesia. People liked Zello for PTT communications because it worked well even with poor network conditions, it was fast and it was free. The fact that Zello also had “channels” that could be used like CB radio channels for public group chats was a plus. Initially, Jonet was a member of several channels representing different cities in Indonesia, but he wanted one place where he could talk to all his newfound friends and coordinate gatherings.

As a result, Jonet created his “Komunitas Zello Indonesia” channel on June 23, 2012. It was easy to do and an immediate success. “Komunitas Zello Indonesia” — which translates to “Indonesian Zello Community” — has grown to 870 members, many who have become good friends. They hold regular meetings such as game competitions, sports and music events, picnics and visiting homes of “Zelloites” in neighboring cities, where they just hang out.

In addition to their many small gatherings, members of the channel also use it to organize charity events. In 2013, they held a blood drive and a charity event for a local orphanage. All coordinated using this Zello channel, people from several cities participated in these events. The members are such big Zello enthusiasts that they had Zello T-shirts made to wear at their events. “Komunitas Zello Indonesia” is an inspiring example of how Zello can be used to bring together people for both fun and good causes.

Here are some photos from their charity events:

Blood Donating1.JPG

Charity Nailunnajah Orphanage2.jpg

A big thanks to “Komunitas Zello Indonesia” for sponsoring these charity events and letting Zello be a part of it!

For more information about “Komunitas Zello Indonesia,” please visit:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/KomunitasZelloIndonesia/

https://www.facebook.com/KomunitasZelloIndonesia

If you manage a Zello PTT channel or know of a channel that should be featured on our blog, please contact support@zello.com.

 

Zello and Zello+ iPhone Update 2.1 Today

By Jim Pickering on March 20, 2013

Zello has a new look. Last month, we released a paid version of Zello for the iPhone called Zello+. We’ve also updated both versions with a new design and new features. Zello uses a left navigation menu instead of the tabs on the bottom of the screen. This helps you quickly get from one screen to another.

What’s that eye staring at me on the talk screen?

See the “eye” on the talk screen in the below screen shot? Think of the new talk screen as having a front and a back. Use the front of the talk screen for talking and the back for the details. Press the “eye” to flip to the back of the talk screen and “see” the details. On the back of the talk screen, you’ll find the History and Profile. For channels, you’ll also see the current list of active users.

     

Tap the tabs at the bottom to switch between the views. If you’re on a channel, the blue power button on the screens allow you to quickly connect to or disconnect from the channel.
     

What’s new in Zello

Zelect channels

You have three choices for channel channel types: “Anyone can talk,” “Listen only” and “Zelect,” the all-new type.

When you set your channel to Zelect, new users can only listen to others and talk to moderators. Once the owner or a moderator of the channel identifies you as a trusted member, you can talk and be heard by everyone. If you are new to a Zelect channel, you’ll see the moderator’s Zello name and a light yellow background when he or she speaks to you.  Be nice and ask for permission to join the channel.

     

If you’re the owner or moderator of a Zelect channel, you have some new tools to manage the channel.  Tap the arrow to access the moderator tools.  You can talk to all the moderators, mute all of the untrusted users, talk to a single moderator or talk to a single untrusted user. When selecting a single user, you can: trust, block, make the user a moderator or return to talking to all users. (Only the channel owner can promote someone to moderator.)

     

Volume control

Sometimes users can be too loud or not loud enough that you need to adjust their volume.  You now have two ways to do this: on the user’s profile screen, move the slider to adjust the volume, or on the talk screen, slide your finger up and down just to the right of the talk button to adjust the volume for the user currently talking.  The title will display the current setting and a small arrow will rotate along the edge of the talk button.  Zello will remember the volume setting for each user.

     

History for alerts

Alerts are now saved to history. You can see alerts in your History feed along with voice messages. To delete, tap the Trash button at the bottom, select the entries to delete and tap “Delete.”

     

Share a channel

Share a channel with your friends using Facebook, Twitter, e-mail or a text message.  Select the profile for the channel, then Share icon to the right of the camera icon.

     

Active notifications

When someone sends you a contact request or channel invitation you will see a blue notification in the status bar. If you tap the notification, Zello will take you to the user or channel profile so you can approve or block the request right away. In the below screen shot, Green Kitty sent a contact request. Tap the notification to view the profile screen for Green Kitty.

     

When someone is talking, Zello displays a black notification with the user’s name.  If you tap that, Zello takes you to the talk screen for that user or channel.  The below screen shows a notification that Green Kitty is talking. Tap that and Zello switches to the talk screen for Green Kitty.

     

Manage blocked users and channels

When someone sends you a contact request or a channel invitation, you can block or flag the request.  If you change your mind later, you  can now remove those blocked requests. Press the Gear icon next to your Zello username to acces your profile. Icons will appear on the bottom of the Profile Tool menu if you have blocked channels or contacts.  Tap the Blocked Channel or Blocked Contacts icon to manage the blocked requests.

     

Whats new in Zello+

If you throw 99 pennies at us for Zello+,  you get all the new features in Zello plus you can customize Zello alerts.

Custom alerts

     

Select an alert sound from our Zello site …

     

Or choose a song from your Music library and use part of it as an alert.

     

Happy Zello … ing

Channels, what is everyone talking about?

By Jim Pickering on May 29, 2012

Zello is a great Walkie-Talkie app, but it is so much more.    Channels are a really cool way to link a lot of people together.  There are a number of ways to use them, here are a few examples.

Coordinate

Let’s say you are the band director for a High School and you have a big competition coming up.  Out on the field you have other directors and volunteers helping to coordinate the madness.  Everyone is split up, 100 yards from one end to the other.  What do you do?  Yes, you have a mobile phone,  call them… all 20 of them….one, by one… That’s not going to work, the bands performance will be over by the time all of you talk.

I know, you could buy 20 walkie-talkies and hand them out to everyone.  You need to make sure they all have full batteries, all are on the same frequency, pass them out, collect them when the performance is over.  It’s another device to carry around, and who are these random people that keep talking on this channel?

This is where the channel feature of Zello really shines. Everyone downloads Zello to  their smartphone, then one of you can create a channel, let’s say “HS Band 2012”, or whatever catchy name you can come up with.  Make it password protected so only you and your team can use it.

Everyone can now add the new channel to their contact list.  Select your new channel, press the talk button and everyone can hear you.  Oh, and it’s free.

Sharing

Channels can also be used to create social groups to share information on common interests.  Create a group called “Best Restaurants in  ->Austin<-” (insert your city ->here<- )  People love to share their dining experiences.

There are thousands of channels on Zello right now, join the fun.

Social Radio

You can also use a channel like a podcast.  When you create the channel, select “Listen Only”.  This will allow you to talk and talk…and talk, others can listen to you but can’t interrupt you.

It’s like having your own radio station.

Coming up

Stay tuned, we are adding new tools to help share and manage your channels. Look for our next post that will describe these cool new features.

 

Wisconsin Times on Zello

By Bill Moore on May 2, 2012

Established communities like readers of The Wisconsin Times use  Zello as the place to come alive with voice.  To join in, search channels for wisconsin

Zouth by Zouthwest

By Alexey Gavrilov on March 23, 2012

Greetings to all! I’m Meaghan Grant, Sales Associate and newest member of the Zello family. I will be lending my voice to this little blog every now and again.

Several weeks ago the intrepid Zello marketing team of three…and a half (Jim lives there)…packed up shop and headed to Austin for the annual South-by-Southwest conference. To the average hipster South-by-Southwest (SXSW) elicits nothing more than images of concerts and mosh pits.  Those of us in-the-know recognize it for the techie nirvana it really is, beginning with the huge kickoff weekend dedicated to new and emerging technology. Zello took full advantage of the festival to gather consumer feedback and attend events highlighting the geniuses of the tech world. We also took the time to make this awesome video (Teresa, you’re brilliant) illustrating a sweet new angle: Zello Channels.  Check it out!

Zello Push-to-Talk @ SXSW

This feature opens a world of possibilities. Not only can you use the Push-to-Talk app to communicate via voice instantly, but you can also create and personalize channels to reach whole groups of people. As Teresa mentioned in the video- how neat would it be for an event like SXSW? A voice interactive information desk that anyone and everyone can access.  Pretty cool? We think so.

Keep an eye on our facebook page for upcoming opportunities to tell us how you think Zello Channels could be used or tweet your inspiration now #ZelloChannels!

 

Meaghan